Morghan Leia Richardson

Attorney Profile

Top Rated Family Law Attorney in New York, NY

Richardson Legal PLLC
 | 1350 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 250
New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-537-6744
Selected to Rising Stars: 2013 - 2017
Licensed Since: 2008
Practice Areas:
  • Family Law
Attorney Profile

Morghan Leia Richardson is the managing attorney of Richardson Legal PLLC, with offices in Midtown Manhattan and Astoria, Queens. Ms. Richardson focuses her practice on family law and regularly handles cases that involve complex divorce litigation, uncontested divorce, divorce mediation, child custody, child support, orders of protection and family offense petitions.

Before pursuing a career in law, Ms. Richardson worked as an investigative reporter and was the recipient of a journalism award from Texas Associated Press Managing Editors for a news story on a suspicious adoption. She attended Tulane University Law School, where she served as a managing editor for the school’s maritime law journal, and graduated with a Juris Doctor.

Prior to practicing family law, Ms. Richardson worked in business litigation, representing Fortune 500 companies. That experience, and her personal life as a divorced parent, gives Ms. Richardson the ability to fight for the rights of her clients. She understands the challenges that come with divorce and other family law matters and seeks to find the best solution possible. Ms. Richardson holds a basic training for divorce mediation certificate from The Center for Mediation & Training in New York City.

Ms. Richardson is extremely active in her local and legal community. She is the author of several articles on divorce for The Huffington Post and other publications.   In 2007, Ms. Richardson was presented with the president’s citation award from the Maryland Bar Foundation. She is a member of the Queens County Bar Association, the Maryland State Bar Association and the New York State Bar Association, where she currently serves on the Committee for Women in the Law.

 
Practice Areas
Lawyer Practice Area Pie Chart

Family Law (100%): Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Custody & Visitation, Dissolution, Divorce, Domestic Violence, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements, Marital Property, Same Sex Family Law, Father's Rights

Focus Areas

Family Law: Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Custody & Visitation, Dissolution, Divorce, Domestic Violence, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements, Marital Property, Same Sex Family Law, Father's Rights

Selections

top-imageSelected to Rising Stars for 5 years

Rising Stars: 2013 - 2017

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About Morghan Richardson

Admitted: 2008, New York

Professional Webpage: http://www.richardsonlegalpllc.com/attorneys.html

Honors and Awards:

  • Award for pro bono work on a contested adoption case in Maryland., President's Citation, Maryland Bar Foundation, 2007
  • Award for outstanding commitment to pro bono case involving a contested adoption., Pro Bono Attorney of the Year, Spriggs & Hollingsworth LLP, 2006
  • Journalism award for investigative reporting on a suspicious and botched adoption in Galveston County, Texas., Investigative Reporting, Second Place, The Associated Press Managing Editors Association of Texas, 2001
  • Winning the Associated Press Managing Editors of Texas Award in Investigative Journalism

Special Licenses/Certifications:

  • QDROs and Pensions: Advanced Training in Divorce Mediation with the Center for Mediation and Training, New York, NY, 2013
  • Certificate in Basic Training for Divorce Mediation from the Center for Mediation and Training, New York, NY, 2010

Bar/Professional Activity:

  • Member, New York State Bar Association, Committee for Women in the Law, 2013 - Present Subcommittee co-chair for the Women on the Move initiative, 2017 - Present
  • President's Citation, Maryland Bar Foundation, 2007
  • Member, Maryland State Bar Association, 2005 - Present
  • Member, New York State Bar Association, 2008 - Present
  • Member, New York State Council on Divorce Mediation, 2010 - Present
  • Member, Queens County Bar Association, 2012 - Present
  • U.S. District Court Eastern District of New York
  • U.S. District Court Southern District of New York
  • U.S. District Court District of Maryland
  • U.S. District Court Eastern District of Louisiana
  • District of Columbia, 2006
  • New York, 2008
  • Maryland, 2005

Pro bono/Community Service:

  • 2001 Investigative Reporting - Second Place, The Associated Press Managing Editors Association of Texas, 2001

Scholarly Lectures and Writings:

  • Leah was still chained to her ex-husband: two years after the civil court granted her a divorce. Her ex-husband Dovid, a devote orthodox Jew, still refused to give her a religious divorce called a "get." Without the religious divorce, Leah would not be able to remarry -- or even date -- in her community. Her life was on hold, tied to her ex -- at his whim. And she is not alone. The number of Jewish women being denied a religious divorce is on the rise. The results are devastating: Younger women with children and little money are forced to forgo financial payments or even custody in exchange for a get. Out of desperation, people start taking matters into their own hands. Recently, several rabbis were arrested in a plot to beat reluctant husbands into giving gets. This so-called "Get Crisis," is the product of a myriad of factors, which may be avoided by using divorce mediation. In this piece we explore five ways that divorce mediation can help resolve the get crisis., Co-Author, 5 Ways That Divorce Mediation Can Help Resolve the 'Get' Crisis, Mediate.com, 2014
  • This holiday season, you are thinking: "Just one more time." One more time around your mother-in-law's nasty snide comments; one more draining day of yule-tide "merriment"; and one last New Year's hurrah. After the confetti settles, the weight of the relationship will be too much. In fact, the stress could do you in. So you will say "never again," and spend the next year (or more) getting divorced. And you are not alone. The statistics overwhelmingly show that you, and many others like you, are struggling through one last marital holiday season. Every year, we in the divorce industry know that January 1 is met with a spike in divorce filings. After the tree lights come down, my phone lights up. The holidays have a special magic that no one wants to disturb. Divorce conversations are intentionally avoided, because who wants to mar this season with bad memories? Trust me: you can make it through this holiday., Author, That Special Time of Year: Holidays Mean Waiting To Divorce, The Huffington Post, 2013
  • Gentlemen, let me confirm what you have long suspected: if you are the primary income earner in your family, particularly where your wife has stayed at home, be prepared to pay in your divorce. For the most part, laws have consistently leaned towards protecting women who do not work, who set aside careers (or never start one) and raise children. These laws favor the idea that there is an inherent value in raising children and tending to the family. As society changes in the workforce and in our expectations of parental duties, men can still be caught off-guard by somewhat antiquated laws that are slower and more resistant to change. So what you have long suspected is generally true: "It is cheaper to keep her.", Author, Gentlemen: It Is "Cheaper to Keep Her", The Huffington Post, 2013
  • Good listening skills aren't just important to relationships. They can also keep you out of jail. I see it all the time: guys are dumbfounded that their wives take drastic measures to get their attention when they want a divorce. But it's no surprise to me. Aside from being a woman and a divorce lawyer, I was also a "mean girl" in high school. I know how they operate. Here's a few simple things to understand how your wife operates too., Author, Top 3 Tips To Avoid a "Mean Girl" Style Divorce, The Huffington Post, 2013
  • Primary bread-winners repeat after me: you agreed to pay the bills during the marriage and you are stuck paying after the divorce. Many times, the amount isn’t unfair, but rather the fact that you are forced to pay an ex-spouse (who probably gave you some emotional scars). And, on top of that, you have no ability to control how that money is spent (or if that money is even spent on the child — or her endless shoe collection). , Author, Child-Support: Paying Your Fair-Share Or Funding Your Ex-Spouse’s Spending Spree?, The Good Men Project, 2013
  • I've seen it in my practice a million times: a spouse comes up with a million reasons why their ex is a horrible person, shouldn't see the kids and should be in jail. But in the end, the kids are hurt by lack of access to both parents, both parties suffer in a torrid, expensive court case, and the "victim" comes off as a drama queen to friends, family and their employer. The real culprit: Divorce guilt., Author, Stop Painting Your Ex as a Horrible, Negligent Addict and Resolve Your Divorce Guilt, The Huffington Post, 2013
  • Anne’s ex-husband was an obsessive, controlling and verbally abusive police officer. He drank. He cheated. And when Anne protested, he threatened to use his job to take custody of their preschool-aged kids and make her life a living hell. He also threatened to use his position as the sole bread-winner to hire the best lawyer and steam-roll over her in court. Yet, rather than feeling trapped and overwhelmed, Anne seized control of the situation – by taking control of her finances., Author, True story: How to squirrel away $5,000 to get out of a horrible marriage (and get the kids, house and alimony), Bankruptcy in New Jersey, 2013
  • Every married woman needs at least $5,000 in a bank account in her own name – no matter what her husband thinks. But should your account indeed be a “divorce slush fund”?  Maybe. I don’t need to throw a bunch of grim divorce rate statistics at you. If you live in this world, you already know. So let’s get real: An account held jointly in both spouses’ names can be accessed by either person. If your husband drains the account, a judge may require he pay you back some of it. But that can take months or even years. What will you do until then?  How do you hire a lawyer to make him pay it back?  How do you pay your bills and feed your kids? He may not pay child support or alimony unless that same judge requires him to do so – again, this takes time. How will you make it?, Author, Every woman needs $5,000 in her own account – even if it’s a secret, Wealthy Single Mommy, 2012
  • The Notice Pleading Restoration Act's attempt to reverse 'Twombly' and 'Iqbal' pleading standards. Twombly and Iqbal marked a significant change in the way federal courts evaluate motions to dismiss made under Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b)(6). In direct response to Twombly and Iqbal, Sen. Arlen Specter, D.-Pa., introduced the Notice Pleading Restoration Act of 2009 (S. 1504). The bill seeks to reverse Twombly and Iqbal in favor of a return to the dismissal standard set by Conley, and in effect lower the pleading bar that Twombly and Iqbal have raised., Co-Author, "Lowering the Raised Bar," (The Notice Pleading Restoration Act’s attempt to reverse ‘Twombly’ and ‘Iqbal’ pleading standards), Law.com, 2009
  • Managing Editor of the prestigious Tulane Maritime Law Journal

Video:

  • Emma Johnson, blogger and financial reporter, talks to the lawyers at Richardson Legal PLLC about our practice and our top three tips when looking for a divorce firm in this post originally featured on We Heart Astoria (dot) com., Three things to look for in a divorce attorney, 2013
  • Family and divorce courts are increasingly telling stay-at-home-moms to get back to work.  Watch me speak with financial & single mom blogger Emma Johnson about the issue., Courts to stay-at-home-moms: “Get a job!”, 2013

Educational Background:

  • Florida Atlantic University, B.A., 1999
Office Location for Morghan Leia Richardson

1350 Avenue of the Americas
Suite 250
New York, NY 10019

Phone: 212-537-6744

 

Morghan Leia Richardson:

Last Updated: 3/15/2017

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